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Health Information National Trends Survey
Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

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63 Items found.

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H1 = HINTS 1 (2003)

H2 = HINTS 2 (2005)

H3 = HINTS 3 (2008)

H4Cyc1 = HINTS 4 Cycle 1 (2011)

H4Cyc2 = HINTS 4 Cycle 2 (2012)

H4Cyc3 = HINTS 4 Cycle 3 (2013)

H4Cyc4 = HINTS 4 Cycle 4 (2014)

FDA = HINTS FDA (2015)

FDACyc2 = HINTS FDA Cycle 2 (2017)

H5Cyc1 = HINTS 5 Cycle 1 (2017)

H5Cyc2 = HINTS 5 Cycle 2 (2018)

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*Select from the green boxes below to view survey responses.

Risk Perceptions
How likely do you think it is that you will develop colon cancer in the future?
Read Related Articles
"I Don't Know" My Cancer Risk: Exploring Deficits in Cancer Knowledge and Information-Seeking Skills to Explain an Often-Overlooked Participant Response. View questions related to this article

Can the inpatient hospital setting be a golden opportunity to improve colon cancer screening rates in the United States? View questions related to this article

An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention. View questions related to this article

"Don't know" responses to risk perception measures: implications for underserved populations. View questions related to this article

Relationships among health perceptions vary depending on stage of readiness for colorectal cancer screening. View questions related to this article

An evaluation of colonoscopy use: Implications for health education. View questions related to this article

Beliefs, risk perceptions, and gaps in knowledge as barriers to colorectal cancer screening in older adults. View questions related to this article

Improving rates for screening colonoscopy: Analysis of the health information national trends survey (HINTS I) data. View questions related to this article

Risk perceptions and worry about cancer: does gender make a difference? View questions related to this article

Perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations: associations with cancer-related perceptions and behaviours in a US population survey. View questions related to this article

Screening practices in cancer survivors. View questions related to this article

Associations of perceived risk and worry with cancer health-protective actions: data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). View questions related to this article

Are there gender differences in colorectal cancer test use prevalence and correlates? View questions related to this article

Lack of acknowledgment of fruit and vegetable recommendations among nonadherent individuals: associations with information processing and cancer cognitions. View questions related to this article

Predictors of perceived risk for colon cancer in a national probability sample in the United States. View questions related to this article

Cancer information seeking preferences and experiences: disparities between Asian Americans and Whites in the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). View questions related to this article

Absolute and comparative risk perceptions as predictors of cancer worry: moderating effects of gender and psychological distress. View questions related to this article



Read HINTS Briefs
How often do you worry about getting colon cancer?
How likely do you think it is that you will develop cancer in the future?
Read Related Articles
Information-seeking in cancer survivors: application of the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking to HINTS 2007 data. View questions related to this article

Parental cancer beliefs and trust in health information from medical authorities as predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability. View questions related to this article

Mode Effects in Assessing Cancer Worry and Risk Perceptions: Is Social Desirability Bias at Play? View questions related to this article

The smoking behaviors and cancer-related disparities among urban middle aged and older men involved in the criminal justice system. View questions related to this article

Cancer perceptions: Implications from the 2007 health information national trends survey. View questions related to this article

Recency of pap testing and future testing plans among women aged 18-64: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. View questions related to this article

Cancer risk perceptions, beliefs, and physician avoidance in Appalachia: results from the 2008 HINTS Survey. View questions related to this article

Intention to quit smoking: Role of personal and family member cancer diagnosis. View questions related to this article

What does the public know about preventing cancer? Results from the Health Information National TrendsSurvey (HINTS). View questions related to this article

Literacy and cancer anxiety as predictors of health status: An exploratory study. View questions related to this article

Nutrition-related cancer prevention cognitions and behavioral intentions: testing the risk perception attitude framework. View questions related to this article

Risk perceptions and worry about cancer: does gender make a difference? View questions related to this article

Understanding health inequalities for uninsured Americans: a population-wide survey. View questions related to this article

Screening practices in cancer survivors. View questions related to this article

Lack of acknowledgment of fruit and vegetable recommendations among nonadherent individuals: associations with information processing and cancer cognitions. View questions related to this article

Perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations: relationship to perceptions of cancer preventability, risk, and worry. View questions related to this article

Cancer information seeking preferences and experiences: disparities between Asian Americans and Whites in the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). View questions related to this article

Smokers' unrealistic optimism about their risk. View questions related to this article



Read HINTS Briefs
How often do you worry about getting cancer?
Read Related Articles
Association of Smoking Cessation and Intentions to Quit: Role of Occupational Status, Health Professional’s Support, and Perceived Risk. View questions related to this article

Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Findings from the 2013 U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey. View questions related to this article

Physical activity in young adults: a signal detection analysis of Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2007 data. View questions related to this article

Information-seeking in cancer survivors: application of the Comprehensive Model of Information Seeking to HINTS 2007 data. View questions related to this article

The role of illness factors and patient satisfaction in using online health support groups. View questions related to this article

Socioeconomic Status, Attitudes on Use of Health Information, Preventive Behaviors, and Complementary and Alternative Medical Therapies: Using A U.S. National Representative Sample. View questions related to this article

Cancer perceptions: Implications from the 2007 health information national trends survey. View questions related to this article

Recency of pap testing and future testing plans among women aged 18-64: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. View questions related to this article

What does the public know about preventing cancer? Results from the Health Information National TrendsSurvey (HINTS). View questions related to this article

Literacy and cancer anxiety as predictors of health status: An exploratory study. View questions related to this article

Information processing and negative affect: evidence from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. View questions related to this article

Risk perceptions and worry about cancer: does gender make a difference? View questions related to this article

Screening practices in cancer survivors. View questions related to this article

Lack of acknowledgment of fruit and vegetable recommendations among nonadherent individuals: associations with information processing and cancer cognitions. View questions related to this article

Perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations: relationship to perceptions of cancer preventability, risk, and worry. View questions related to this article



Read HINTS Briefs
Can you think of any thing people can do to reduce their chances of getting cancer?
Read Related Articles

Read HINTS Briefs
Select one answer that best represents your opinion about the statement: “I feel like I could easily get cancer in my lifetime.”
How much do you agree or disagree with this statement: I'd rather not know my chance of getting cancer.
If experts had conflicting opinions about a medical test or treatment, I would still be willing to try it.
Medical tests or exams such as colonoscopies, mammograms, and Pap tests that check for early signs of cancer can definitely tell that a person has cancer.
When medical tests or exams such as colonoscopies, mammograms, and Pap tests that check for early signs of cancer find something abnormal, more tests are needed to know if it is cancer.
When medical tests or exams such as colonoscopies, mammograms, and Pap tests that check for early signs of cancer find something abnormal, it is very likely to be cancer.
The harms of medical tests or exams such as colonoscopies, mammograms, and Pap tests that check for early signs of cancer sometimes outweigh the benefits.
Suppose you have been diagnosed with cancer with a moderate chance of survival and several treatment options, what role would you prefer to take in deciding your cancer treatment?
Suppose you have been diagnosed with cancer with a low chance of survival and limited treatment options, what role would you prefer to take in deciding your cancer treatment?
In the past year, how often have you thought about the chemicals contained in tobacco products?
Where do you think the chemicals in cigarettes and cigarette smoke come from?
How long do you think someone has to smoke cigarettes before it harms their health?
How much do you think people harm themselves when they smoke a few cigarettes every day?
How much do you think people harm themselves when they smoke 10 or more cigarettes every day?
How harmful do you think cigarette smoking is to a person's health?
How harmful do you think smokeless tobacco is to a person's health?
How harmful do you think electronic cigarette use is to a person's health?
How harmful do you think smoking tobacco in a hookah is to a person's health?
How harmful do you think smoking roll your own cigarettes is to a person's health?
How harmful do you think smoking a pipe filled with tobacco is to a person's health?
How much do you think people harm themselves when they use smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, snuff, dip, or snus, every day?
How much do you think people harm themselves when they use smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, snuff, dip, or snus, some days but not every day?
Please indicate how much you agree or disagree with the following statement: Tobacco is safer to use now than it was 5 years ago.
Compared to a typical cigarette, would you think that a cigarette advertised as low nicotine would be…Harmful
Compared to a typical cigarette, would you think that a cigarette advertised as low nicotine would be…Addictive
Compared to a typical cigarette, would you think that a cigarette advertised as low nicotine have a…Lung Cancer
How easy is it for you to imagine yourself developing cancer in the future?
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HINTS Data Terms of Use

It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data. It is mandatory that all research results be presented/published in a manner that protects the integrity of the data and ensures the confidentiality of participants.

In order for the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to provide a public-use or another version of data to you, it is necessary that you agree to the following provisions.

  1. You will not present/publish data in which an individual can be identified. Publication of small cell sizes should be avoided.
  2. You will not attempt to link nor permit others to link the data with individually identified records in another database.
  3. You will not attempt to learn the identity of any person whose data are contained in the supplied file(s).
  4. If the identity of any person is discovered inadvertently, then the following should be done;
    1. no use will be made of this knowledge,
    2. the HINTS Program staff will be notified of the incident,
    3. no one else will be informed of the discovered identity.
  5. You will not release nor permit others to release the data in full or in part to any person except with the written approval of the HINTS Program staff.
  6. If accessing the data from a centralized location on a time sharing computer system or LAN, you will not share your logon name and password with any other individuals. You will also not allow any other individuals to use your computer account after you have logged on with your logon name and password.
  7. For all software provided by the HINTS Program, you will not copy, distribute, reverse engineer, profit from its sale or use, or incorporate it in any other software system.
  8. The source of information should be cited in all publications. The appropriate citation is associated with the data file used. Please see Suggested Citations in the Download HINTS Data section of this Web site, or the Readme.txt associated with the ASCII text version of the HINTS data.
  9. Analyses of large HINTS domains usually produce reliable estimates, but analyses of small domains may yield unreliable estimates, as indicated by their large variances. The analyst should pay particular attention to the standard error and coefficient of variation (relative standard error) for estimates of means, proportions, and totals, and the analyst should report these when writing up results. It is important that the analyst realizes that small sample sizes for particular analyses will tend to result in unstable estimates.
  10. You may receive periodic e-mail updates from the HINTS administrators.