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Health Information National Trends Survey
Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Published Articles that use this HINTS Question: What is your marital status?

Oh A, Nguyen AB, Patrick H  2016  Correlates of Reported Use and Perceived Helpfulness of Calorie Information in Restaurants Among U.S. Adults  American Journal of Health Promotion   2015 Jul 9. [Epub ahead of print]

Hirth JM, Laz TH, Rahman M, Berenson AB  2015  Racial/Ethnic Differences Affecting Adherence to Cancer Screening Guidelines Among Women  Journal of Women's Health  

Kobayashi LC, Smith SG.  2015  Cancer Fatalism, Literacy, and Cancer Information Seeking in the American Public  Health Education and Behavior   16.

Kim BH, Wallington SF, Makambi KH, Adams-Campbell LL  2015  Social networks and physical activity behaviors among cancer survivors: data from the 2005 health information national trends survey.  Journal of Health Communication   20(6):656-62. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2015.1018576.

Hay JL, Orom H, Kiviniemi MT, Waters EA  2015  "I Don't Know" My Cancer Risk: Exploring Deficits in Cancer Knowledge and Information-Seeking Skills to Explain an Often-Overlooked Participant Response.  Medical Decision Making   35(4):436-45. doi: 10.1177/0272989X15572827

Orom H  2015  Nativity and Perceived Healthcare Quality  Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health   [Epub ahead of print]

Cutrona SL, Mazor KM, Vieux SN, Luger TM, Volkman JE, Finney Rutten LJ.  2015  Health information-seeking on behalf of others: characteristics of "surrogate seekers".  Journal of Cancer Education   30(1):12-9

Dominick GM, Papas MA, Rogers ML, Rakowski W.  2015  Classification tree analysis to examine influences on colorectal cancer screening.  Cancer Causes & Control   26(3):443-54

Taber J, Leyva B, and Persoskie A  2015  Why do People Avoid Medical Care? A Qualitative Study Using National Data.  Journal of General Internal Medicine   30(3):290-7

Tennant B, Stellefson M, Dodd V, Chaney B, Chaney D, Paige S, Alber J  2015  eHealth literacy and Web 2.0 health information seeking behaviors among baby boomers and older adults  J Med Internet Res   17(3): e70. Published online 2015 Mar 17. doi: 10.2196/jmir.3992

Laiyemo M, Nunlee-Bland G, Lombardo F, Adams RG, Laiyemo A.  2015  Characteristics and health perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine users in the United States.  The American Journal of the Medical Sciences   349(2):140-4

Desai K, Chewning B, and Mott D.  2015  Health care use amongst online buyers of medications and vitamins.  Research in Social & Administrative Pharmacy   pii: S1551-7411(15)00003-0

Manierre, M  2015  Examining the Relationship Between Flexible Resources and Health Information Channel Selection.  Health Communication   [Epub ahead of print]

Manierre, M  2015  Gaps in knowledge: Tracking and explaining gender differences in health information seeking.  Social Science & Medicine   128:151–8

Valle C, Tate D, Mayer D, Allicock M, Cai J, Campbell MK.  2015  Physical activity in young adults: a signal detection analysis of Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2007 data.  Journal of Health Communication   20(2):134-46

Wenhong C  2015  A Moveable Feast: Do Mobile Media Technologies Mobilize or Normalize Cultural Participation?  Human Communication Research   41(1):82–101


Nguyen AB, Oh A, Moser RP, Patrick H  2014  Perceptions of the roles of behaviour and genetics in disease risk: are they associated with behaviour change attempts.  Health Psychology   30(3):336-53

Hamilton J, Breen N, Klabunde C, Moser R, Leyva B, Breslau E, Kobrin S.  2014  Opportunities and Challenges for the Use of Large-Scale Surveys in Public Health Research: A Comparison of the Assessment of Cancer Screening Behaviors.  Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention   24(1);3-14

Laiyemo AO, Adebogun AO, Doubeni CA, Ricks-Santi L, McDonald-Pinkett S, Young PE, Cash BD, Klabunde CN.  2014  Influence of provider discussion and specific recommendation on colorectal cancer screening uptake among U.S. adults.  Preventive Medicine   67:1-5

Nan X, Zhao X, Briones R.  2014  Parental cancer beliefs and trust in health information from medical authorities as predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability.  Journal of Health Communication   19(1):100-14

Lau SC, Chen L, Cheung WY.  2014  Protective skin care behaviors in cancer survivors.  Current Oncology   21(4):e531-40

Moten A, Jeffers K, Larbi D, Smith-White R, Taylor T, Wilson L, Adenuga B, Frederick W, Laiyemo A.  2014  Obesity and Weight Loss Attempts among Subjects with a Personal History of Cancer.  Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal   14(3):e330-6

Campos-Castillo C, Anthony DL.  2014  The double-edged sword of electronic health records: implications for patient disclosure.  Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association   pii: amiajnl-2014-002804

Squiers L, Renaud J, McCormack L, Tzeng J, Bann C, Williams P.  2014  How Accurate Are Americans’ Perceptions of Their Own Weight?  Journal of Health Communication   19(7):795-812

Volkman JE, Luger TM, Harvey KL, Hogan TP, Shimada SL, Amante D, McInnes DK, Feng H, Houston TK.  2014  The National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey [HINTS]: a national cross-sectional analysis of talking to your doctor and other.  BMC Family Practice   6;15:111

Calo WA, Ortiz AP, Colon-Lopez V, Krasny S, Tortolero-Luna G.  2014  Factors associated with perceived patient-provider communication quality among Puerto Ricans.  Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved   25(2):491-502

Kannan VD, Veazie PJ.  2014  Predictors of avoiding medical care and reasons for avoidance behavior.  Medical Care   52(4):336-45

Agaku IT, Adisa AO, Ayo-Yusuf OA, Connolly GN.  2014  Concern about security and privacy, and perceived control over collection and use of health information are related to withholding of health information from healthcare providers.  Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association   21(2):374-8

Evans KR, Hudson SV.  2014  Engaging the community to improve nutrition and physical activity among houses of worship.  Preventing Chronic Disease   11:E38

Madadi M, Zhang S, Yeary KH, Henderson LM.  2014  Analyzing factors associated with women's attitudes and behaviors toward screening mammography using design-based logistic regression.  Breast Cancer Research and Treatment   144(1):193-204

Chen CC, Yamada T, Smith J.  2014  An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention.  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   11(1):1058-75

Chan YM, Huang H.  2013  Weight Management Information Overload Challenges in 2007 HINTS: Socioeconomic, Health Status and Behaviors Correlates.  Journal of Consumer Health on the Internet   17(2)

McCully SN, Don BP, Updegraff JA.  2013  Using the internet to help with diet, weight, and physical activity: Results from the health information national trends survey (HINTS).  Journal of Medical Internet Research   15(8):e148. doi: 10.2196/jmir.2612


Ashok M, Berkowitz Z, Hawkins NA, Tangka F, Saraiya M.  2012  Recency of pap testing and future testing plans among women aged 18-64: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey.  Journal of Women's Health   21(7):705-12


Ho MY, Lai JY, Cheung WY.  2011  The influence of physicians on colorectal cancer screening behavior.  Cancer Causes & Control   22(12):1659-68


Ortiz AP, López M, Flores LT, Soto-Salgado M, Finney Rutten LJ, Serrano-Rodriguez RA., Hesse BW, Tortolero-Luna G.  2011  Awareness of direct-to-consumer genetic tests and use of genetic tests among Puerto Rican adults, 2009.  Preventing Chronic Disease   8(5):A110

Rutten LJF, Blake K, Hesse BW, Ackerson LK.  2011  Isolated and skeptical: Social engagement and trust in information sources among smokers.  Journal of Cancer Education   26(3):465-73

Anhang Price R, Koshiol J, Kobrin S, Tiro JA.  2011  Knowledge and intention to participate in cervical cancer screening after the human papillomavirus vaccine.  Vaccine   29(25):4238-43

Ha S, Lee YJ.  2011  Determinants of consumer-driven healthcare: Self-confidence in information search, health literacy, and trust in information sources.  International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing   5(1):8-24

Cotten SR, Goldner M, Hale TM, Drentea P.  2011  The importance of type, amount, and timing of internet use for understanding psychological distress.  Social Science Quarterly   92(1):119-39



Hesse BW, Arora NK, Burke Beckjord E, Finney Rutten LJ.  2008  Information support for cancer survivors.  Cancer   112(11 Suppl):2529-40

Squiers L, Bright MA, Rutten LJ, Atienza AA, Treiman K, Moser RP, Hesse B.  2006  Awareness of the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service: results from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:117-33

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HINTS Data Terms of Use

It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data. It is mandatory that all research results be presented/published in a manner that protects the integrity of the data and ensures the confidentiality of participants.

In order for the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to provide a public-use or another version of data to you, it is necessary that you agree to the following provisions.

  1. You will not present/publish data in which an individual can be identified. Publication of small cell sizes should be avoided.
  2. You will not attempt to link nor permit others to link the data with individually identified records in another database.
  3. You will not attempt to learn the identity of any person whose data are contained in the supplied file(s).
  4. If the identity of any person is discovered inadvertently, then the following should be done;
    1. no use will be made of this knowledge,
    2. the HINTS Program staff will be notified of the incident,
    3. no one else will be informed of the discovered identity.
  5. You will not release nor permit others to release the data in full or in part to any person except with the written approval of the HINTS Program staff.
  6. If accessing the data from a centralized location on a time sharing computer system or LAN, you will not share your logon name and password with any other individuals. You will also not allow any other individuals to use your computer account after you have logged on with your logon name and password.
  7. For all software provided by the HINTS Program, you will not copy, distribute, reverse engineer, profit from its sale or use, or incorporate it in any other software system.
  8. The source of information should be cited in all publications. The appropriate citation is associated with the data file used. Please see Suggested Citations in the Download HINTS Data section of this Web site, or the Readme.txt associated with the ASCII text version of the HINTS data.
  9. Analyses of large HINTS domains usually produce reliable estimates, but analyses of small domains may yield unreliable estimates, as indicated by their large variances. The analyst should pay particular attention to the standard error and coefficient of variation (relative standard error) for estimates of means, proportions, and totals, and the analyst should report these when writing up results. It is important that the analyst realizes that small sample sizes for particular analyses will tend to result in unstable estimates.
  10. You may receive periodic e-mail updates from the HINTS administrators.