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Health Information National Trends Survey
Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Published Articles that use this HINTS Question: Not including psychiatrists and other mental health professionals, is there a particular doctor, nurse, or other health professional that you see most often?

Finney Rutten LJ, Agunwamba AA, Beckjord E, Hesse BW, Moser RP, Arora NK  2015  The Relation Between Having a Usual Source of Care and Ratings of Care Quality: Does Patient-Centered Communication Play a Role?  Journal of Health Communication   26:1-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Orom H  2015  Nativity and Perceived Healthcare Quality  Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health   [Epub ahead of print]

Finney Rutten LJ, Vieux SN, St Sauver JL, Arora NK, Moser RP, Beckjord EB, Hesse BW.  2014  Patient perceptions of electronic medical records use and ratings of care quality.  Journal of Patient Related Outcome Measures   5:17-23

Chen CC, Yamada T, Smith J.  2014  An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention.  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   11(1):1058-75

Ye J, Shim R, Rust G.  2012  Health care avoidance among people with serious psychological distress: Analyses of 2007 health information national trends survey.  Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved   23(4):1620-9


Ashok M, Berkowitz Z, Hawkins NA, Tangka F, Saraiya M.  2012  Recency of pap testing and future testing plans among women aged 18-64: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey.  Journal of Women's Health   21(7):705-12

Kontos, EZ., Emmons, KM., Puleo, E, Viswanath, K.  2012  Contribution of communication inequalities to disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine awareness and knowledge.  American Journal of Public Health   102(10):1911-20

Anhang Price R, Koshiol J, Kobrin S, Tiro JA.  2011  Knowledge and intention to participate in cervical cancer screening after the human papillomavirus vaccine.  Vaccine   29(25):4238-43

Kontos EZ, Viswanath K.  2011  Cancer-related direct-to-consumer advertising: A critical review.  Nature Reviews Cancer   11(2):142-50

Chou WY, Wang LC, Finney Rutten LJ, Moser RP, Hesse BW.  2010  Factors associated with Americans' ratings of health care quality: what do they tell us about the raters and the health care system?  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:147-56

Kaufman A, Augustson E, Davis K, Finney Rutten LJ.  2010  Awareness and use of tobacco quitlines: evidence from the Health Information National Trends Survey.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:264-78

Koch-Weser S, Bradshaw YS, Gualtieri L, Gallagher SS.  2010  The Internet as a health information source: findings from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey and implications for health communication.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:279-93


Kaphingst KA, Lachance CR, Condit CM.  2009  Beliefs about heritability of cancer and health information seeking and preventive behaviors.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(4):351-6

Berkowitz Z, Hawkins NA, Peipins LA, White MC, & Nadel MR.  2008  Beliefs, risk perceptions, and gaps in knowledge as barriers to colorectal cancer screening in older adults.  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society   56(2): 307-14

Geiger TM, Miedema BW, Geana MV, Thaler K, Rangnekar NJ, Cameron GT.  2008  Improving rates for screening colonoscopy: Analysis of the health information national trends survey (HINTS I) data.  Surgical Endoscopy   22(2):527-33

Mayer DK, Terrin NC, Menon U, Kreps GL, McCance K, Parsons SK, Mooney KH.  2007  Health behaviors in cancer survivors.  Oncology Nursing Forum   34(3):643-51

Mayer DK, Terrin NC, Kreps GL, Menon U, McCance K, Parsons SK, Mooney KH.  2007  Cancer survivors information seeking behaviors: A comparison of survivors who do and do not seek information about cancer.  Patient Education and Counseling   65(3):342-50

Mayer DK, Terrin NC, Menon U, Kreps GL, McCance K, Parsons SK, Mooney KH.  2007  Screening practices in cancer survivors.  Journal of Cancer Survivorship   1(1):17-26

Moser RP, McCaul K, Peters E, Nelson W, Marcus SE.  2007  Associations of perceived risk and worry with cancer health-protective actions: data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Journal of Health Psychology   12(1):53-65

Stoddard JL, Augustson EM.  2006  Smokers who use Internet and smokers who don't: Data from the Health Information and National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Nicotine & Tobacco Research   8(Suppl 1):S77-S85

Rakowski W, Meissner H, Vernon SW, Breen N, Rimer B, Clark MA.  2006  Correlates of repeat and recent mammography for women ages 45 to 75 in the 2002 to 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS 2003).  Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention   15(11):2093-101

McQueen A, Vernon SW, Meissner HI, Klabunde CN, Rakowski W.  2006  Are there gender differences in colorectal cancer test use prevalence and correlates?  Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention   15(4):782-91


Rutten LJ, Squiers L, Hesse B.  2006  Cancer-related information seeking: hints from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:147-56

Ford JS, Coups EJ, Hay JL.  2006  Knowledge of colon cancer screening in a national probability sample in the United States.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:19-35

Finney Rutten LJ, Wanke K, Augustson E.  2005  Systems and individual factors associated with smoking status: evidence from HINTS.  American Journal of Health Behavior   29(4):302-10

Finney Rutten LJ, Meissner HI, Breen N, Vernon SW, Rimer BK.  2005  Factors associated with men's use of prostate-specific antigen screening: evidence from Health Information National Trends Survey.  Preventive Medicine   40(4):461-8

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HINTS Data Terms of Use

It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data. It is mandatory that all research results be presented/published in a manner that protects the integrity of the data and ensures the confidentiality of participants.

In order for the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to provide a public-use or another version of data to you, it is necessary that you agree to the following provisions.

  1. You will not present/publish data in which an individual can be identified. Publication of small cell sizes should be avoided.
  2. You will not attempt to link nor permit others to link the data with individually identified records in another database.
  3. You will not attempt to learn the identity of any person whose data are contained in the supplied file(s).
  4. If the identity of any person is discovered inadvertently, then the following should be done;
    1. no use will be made of this knowledge,
    2. the HINTS Program staff will be notified of the incident,
    3. no one else will be informed of the discovered identity.
  5. You will not release nor permit others to release the data in full or in part to any person except with the written approval of the HINTS Program staff.
  6. If accessing the data from a centralized location on a time sharing computer system or LAN, you will not share your logon name and password with any other individuals. You will also not allow any other individuals to use your computer account after you have logged on with your logon name and password.
  7. For all software provided by the HINTS Program, you will not copy, distribute, reverse engineer, profit from its sale or use, or incorporate it in any other software system.
  8. The source of information should be cited in all publications. The appropriate citation is associated with the data file used. Please see Suggested Citations in the Download HINTS Data section of this Web site, or the Readme.txt associated with the ASCII text version of the HINTS data.
  9. Analyses of large HINTS domains usually produce reliable estimates, but analyses of small domains may yield unreliable estimates, as indicated by their large variances. The analyst should pay particular attention to the standard error and coefficient of variation (relative standard error) for estimates of means, proportions, and totals, and the analyst should report these when writing up results. It is important that the analyst realizes that small sample sizes for particular analyses will tend to result in unstable estimates.
  10. You may receive periodic e-mail updates from the HINTS administrators.