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Health Information National Trends Survey
Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Published Articles that use this HINTS Question: Do you ever go on-line to access the Internet or World Wide Web, or to send and receive e-mail?


Prestin A, Vieux SN, Chou WY  2015  Is Online Health Activity Alive and Well or Flatlining? Findings From 10 Years of the Health Information National Trends Survey.  Journal of Health Communication   4:1-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Blake K, Ottenbacher A, Finney Rutten LJ, Grady M, Kobrin S, Jacobson R, Hesse BW.  2015  Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Knowledge in 2013: Gaps and Opportunities for Targeted Communication Strategies.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine   48(4):402-10

Cutrona SL, Mazor KM, Vieux SN, Luger TM, Volkman JE, Finney Rutten LJ.  2015  Health information-seeking on behalf of others: characteristics of "surrogate seekers".  Journal of Cancer Education   30(1):12-9

Leiter A, Diefenbach MA, Doucette J, Oh WK, Galsky MD.  2015  Clinical trial awareness: Changes over time and sociodemographic disparities.  Clinical Trials   pii: 1740774515571917

Agurs-Collins T, Ferrer R, Ottenbacher A, Waters EA, O'Connell ME, Hamilton JG.  2015  Public Awareness of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Findings from the 2013 U.S. Health Information National Trends Survey.  Journal of Cancer Education   [Epub ahead of print]

Valle C, Tate D, Mayer D, Allicock M, Cai J, Campbell MK.  2015  Physical activity in young adults: a signal detection analysis of Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2007 data.  Journal of Health Communication   20(2):134-46

Hesse BW, Gaysynsky A, Ottenbacher A, Moser RP, Blake KD, Chou WY, Vieux S, Beckjord E.  2014  Meeting the healthy people 2020 goals: using the Health Information National Trends Survey to monitor progress on health communication objectives.  Journal of Health Communication   19(12):1497-509

Volkman JE, Luger TM, Harvey KL, Hogan TP, Shimada SL, Amante D, McInnes DK, Feng H, Houston TK.  2014  The National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey [HINTS]: a national cross-sectional analysis of talking to your doctor and other.  BMC Family Practice   6;15:111

Wilson EV, Balkan S, Lankton NK.   2014  Trends in U.S. Consumers’ Use of E-Health Services: Fine-Grained Results from a Longitudinal, Demographic Survey.  Communications of the Association for Information Systems   34(73) 


Kontos, EZ., Emmons, KM., Puleo, E, Viswanath, K.  2012  Contribution of communication inequalities to disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine awareness and knowledge.  American Journal of Public Health   102(10):1911-20


Chou WY, Liu B, Post S, Hesse B.  2011  Health-related Internet use among cancer survivors: Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey, 2003-2008.  Journal of Cancer Survivorship   5(3):263-70


Rutten LJF, Blake K, Hesse BW, Ackerson LK.  2011  Isolated and skeptical: Social engagement and trust in information sources among smokers.  Journal of Cancer Education   26(3):465-73

Cotten SR, Goldner M, Hale TM, Drentea P.  2011  The importance of type, amount, and timing of internet use for understanding psychological distress.  Social Science Quarterly   92(1):119-39

Kontos EZ, Emmons KM, Puleo E, Viswanath K  2010  Communication inequalities and public health implications of adult social networking site use in the United States.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:216-35

Peytchev A, Ridenhour J, Krotki K.  2010  Differences between RDD telephone and ABS mail survey design: coverage, unit nonresponse, and measurement error.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:117-34


Kaphingst KA, Lachance CR, Condit CM.  2009  Beliefs about heritability of cancer and health information seeking and preventive behaviors.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(4):351-6

Hoffman-Goetz L, Meissner HI, Thomson MD.  2009  Literacy and cancer anxiety as predictors of health status: An exploratory study.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(3):218-24

Roach AR, Lykins EL, Gochett CG, Brechting EH, Graue LO, Andrykowski MA.  2009  Differences in cancer information-seeking behavior, preferences, and awareness between cancer survivors and healthy controls: A national, population-based survey.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(1):73-9

Tian Y, Robinson JD.  2008  Incidental health information use and media complementarity: a comparison of senior and non-senior cancer patients.  Patient Education and Counseling   71(3):340-4


Mayer DK, Terrin NC, Kreps GL, Menon U, McCance K, Parsons SK, Mooney KH.  2007  Cancer survivors information seeking behaviors: A comparison of survivors who do and do not seek information about cancer.  Patient Education and Counseling   65(3):342-50

Vanderpool R, Huang B, Shelton B.  2007  Seeking Cancer Information: An Appalachian Perspective.  Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice   2(1):79-100

Stoddard JL, Augustson EM.  2006  Smokers who use Internet and smokers who don't: Data from the Health Information and National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Nicotine & Tobacco Research   8(Suppl 1):S77-S85

Atienza AA, Yaroch AL, Masse LC, Moser RP, Hesse BW, King AC.  2006  Identifying sedentary subgroups: the National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine   31(5):383-90


Hesse BW, Nelson DE, Kreps GL, Croyle RT, Arora NK, Rimer BK, Viswanath K.  2005  Trust and sources of health information: the impact of the Internet and its implications for health care providers: findings from the first Health Information National Trends Survey.  JAMA Internal Medicine   165(22):2618-24

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HINTS Data Terms of Use

It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data. It is mandatory that all research results be presented/published in a manner that protects the integrity of the data and ensures the confidentiality of participants.

In order for the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to provide a public-use or another version of data to you, it is necessary that you agree to the following provisions.

  1. You will not present/publish data in which an individual can be identified. Publication of small cell sizes should be avoided.
  2. You will not attempt to link nor permit others to link the data with individually identified records in another database.
  3. You will not attempt to learn the identity of any person whose data are contained in the supplied file(s).
  4. If the identity of any person is discovered inadvertently, then the following should be done;
    1. no use will be made of this knowledge,
    2. the HINTS Program staff will be notified of the incident,
    3. no one else will be informed of the discovered identity.
  5. You will not release nor permit others to release the data in full or in part to any person except with the written approval of the HINTS Program staff.
  6. If accessing the data from a centralized location on a time sharing computer system or LAN, you will not share your logon name and password with any other individuals. You will also not allow any other individuals to use your computer account after you have logged on with your logon name and password.
  7. For all software provided by the HINTS Program, you will not copy, distribute, reverse engineer, profit from its sale or use, or incorporate it in any other software system.
  8. The source of information should be cited in all publications. The appropriate citation is associated with the data file used. Please see Suggested Citations in the Download HINTS Data section of this Web site, or the Readme.txt associated with the ASCII text version of the HINTS data.
  9. Analyses of large HINTS domains usually produce reliable estimates, but analyses of small domains may yield unreliable estimates, as indicated by their large variances. The analyst should pay particular attention to the standard error and coefficient of variation (relative standard error) for estimates of means, proportions, and totals, and the analyst should report these when writing up results. It is important that the analyst realizes that small sample sizes for particular analyses will tend to result in unstable estimates.
  10. You may receive periodic e-mail updates from the HINTS administrators.