Skip to main content
Health Information National Trends Survey
Part of NCI's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Published Articles Using HINTS Data

Narrow your results by section...

    

2015

Emanuel AS, Kiviniemi MT, Howell JL, Hay JL, Waters EA, Orom H, Shepperd JA  2015  Avoiding cancer risk information  Social Science & Medicine   147:113-120.

Hay JL, Orom H, Kiviniemi MT, Waters EA  2015  "I Don't Know" My Cancer Risk: Exploring Deficits in Cancer Knowledge and Information-Seeking Skills to Explain an Often-Overlooked Participant Response.  Medical Decision Making   35(4):436-45. doi: 10.1177/0272989X15572827

2014

Chen CC, Yamada T, Smith J.  2014  An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention.  International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   11(1):1058-75

Hamilton J, Breen N, Klabunde C, Moser R, Leyva B, Breslau E, Kobrin S.  2014  Opportunities and Challenges for the Use of Large-Scale Surveys in Public Health Research: A Comparison of the Assessment of Cancer Screening Behaviors.  Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention   24(1);3-14

Laiyemo AO, Adebogun AO, Doubeni CA, Ricks-Santi L, McDonald-Pinkett S, Young PE, Cash BD, Klabunde CN.  2014  Influence of provider discussion and specific recommendation on colorectal cancer screening uptake among U.S. adults.  Preventive Medicine   67:1-5

Nawaz H, Via C, Shahrokni A, Ramdass P, Raoof A, Sunkara S, Petraro P.  2014  Can the inpatient hospital setting be a golden opportunity to improve colon cancer screening rates in the United States?  Health Promotion Practice   15(4):506-511

2013

Jun J, Oh K.  2013  Asian and Hispanic Americans’ cancer fatalism and colon cancer screening.  American Journal of Health Behavior   37(2):145-54

Waters EA, Hay JL, Orom H, Kiviniemi MT, Drake BF.  2013  "Don't know" responses to risk perception measures: implications for underserved populations.  Medical Decision Making   33(2):271-81

2012

Oliver JS, Worley CB, Decoster J, Palardy L, Kim G, Reddy A, Allen RS.  2012  Disparities in Colorectal Cancer screening behaviors: Implications for African American men.  Gastroenterology Nursing   35(2):93-8

2011

Ferrer RA, Hall KL, Portnoy DB, Ling BS, Han PKJ, Klein WMP.  2011  Relationships among health perceptions vary depending on stage of readiness for colorectal cancer screening.  Health Psychology   30(5):525-35

Ho MY, Lai JY, Cheung WY.  2011  The influence of physicians on colorectal cancer screening behavior.  Cancer Causes & Control   22(12):1659-68

Underhill ML, Kiviniemi MT.  2011  The association of perceived provider-patient communication and relationship quality with Colorectal Cancer screening.  Health Education and Behavior   39(5):555-63

2010

Chen CC, Basch CE, Yamada T.  2010  An evaluation of colonoscopy use: Implications for health education.  Journal of Cancer Education   25(2):160-5

Ciampa PJ, Osborn CY, Peterson NB, Rothman RL  2010  Patient numeracy, perceptions of provider communication, and colorectal cancer screening utilization.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:157-68

Clayman ML, Manganello JA, Viswanath K, Hesse BW, Arora NK.  2010  Providing health messages to Hispanics/Latinos: understanding the importance of language, trust in health information sources, and media use.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:252-63

Hawkins NA, Berkowitz Z, Peipins LA.  2010  What does the public know about preventing cancer? Results from the Health Information National TrendsSurvey (HINTS).  Health Education and Behavior   37(4):490-503

Zhao X.  2010  Cancer information disparities between U.S.- and foreign-born populations.  Journal of Health Communication   15 Suppl 3:5-21

2009

Finney Rutten LJ, Hesse BW, Moser RP, McCaul K, Rothman, AJ.  2009  Public understanding of cancer prevention, detection, and survival/cure: Comparison with state-of-science evidence for colon, skin, and lung Cancer.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(1):40-8

Han PK, Moser RP, Klein WM, Beckjord EB, Dunlavy AC, Hesse BW.  2009  Predictors of perceived ambiguity about cancer prevention recommendations: Sociodemographic factors and mass media exposures.  Health Communication   24(8):764-72

Kaphingst KA, Lachance CR, Condit CM.  2009  Beliefs about heritability of cancer and health information seeking and preventive behaviors.  Journal of Cancer Education   24(4):351-6

Tian Y, Robinson JD.  2009  Incidental health information use on the Internet.  Health Communication   24(1):41-49

2008

Berkowitz Z, Hawkins NA, Peipins LA, White MC, & Nadel MR.  2008  Beliefs, risk perceptions, and gaps in knowledge as barriers to colorectal cancer screening in older adults.  Journal of the American Geriatrics Society   56(2): 307-14

Coups EJ, Hay J, & Ford JS.  2008  Awareness of the role of physical activity in colon cancer prevention.  Patient Education and Counseling   72(2): 246-51

Geiger TM, Miedema BW, Geana MV, Thaler K, Rangnekar NJ, Cameron GT.  2008  Improving rates for screening colonoscopy: Analysis of the health information national trends survey (HINTS I) data.  Surgical Endoscopy   22(2):527-33

McQueen A, Vernon SW, Meissner HI, Rakowski W.  2008  Risk perceptions and worry about cancer: does gender make a difference?  Journal of Health Communication   13(1):56-79

2007

Mayer DK, Terrin NC, Menon U, Kreps GL, McCance K, Parsons SK, Mooney KH.  2007  Screening practices in cancer survivors.  Journal of Cancer Survivorship   1(1):17-26

Moser RP, McCaul K, Peters E, Nelson W, Marcus SE.  2007  Associations of perceived risk and worry with cancer health-protective actions: data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).  Journal of Health Psychology   12(1):53-65

2006

Ford JS, Coups EJ, Hay JL.  2006  Knowledge of colon cancer screening in a national probability sample in the United States.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:19-35

Hay J, Coups E, Ford J.  2006  Predictors of perceived risk for colon cancer in a national probability sample in the United States.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:71-92

Ling BS, Klein WM, Dang Q.  2006  Relationship of communication and information measures to colorectal cancer screening utilization: results from HINTS.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:181-90

McQueen A, Vernon SW, Meissner HI, Klabunde CN, Rakowski W.  2006  Are there gender differences in colorectal cancer test use prevalence and correlates?  Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention   15(4):782-91

Shim M, Kelly B, Hornik R.  2006  Cancer information scanning and seeking behavior is associated with knowledge, lifestyle choices, and screening.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:157-72

Zajac LE, Klein WM, McCaul KD.  2006  Absolute and comparative risk perceptions as predictors of cancer worry: moderating effects of gender and psychological distress.  Journal of Health Communication   11 Suppl 1:37-49.3

X

HINTS Data Terms of Use

It is of utmost importance to ensure the confidentiality of survey participants. Every effort has been made to exclude identifying information on individual respondents from the computer files. Some demographic information such as sex, race, etc., has been included for research purposes. NCI expects that users of the data set will adhere to the strictest standards of ethical conduct for the analysis and reporting of nationally collected survey data. It is mandatory that all research results be presented/published in a manner that protects the integrity of the data and ensures the confidentiality of participants.

In order for the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to provide a public-use or another version of data to you, it is necessary that you agree to the following provisions.

  1. You will not present/publish data in which an individual can be identified. Publication of small cell sizes should be avoided.
  2. You will not attempt to link nor permit others to link the data with individually identified records in another database.
  3. You will not attempt to learn the identity of any person whose data are contained in the supplied file(s).
  4. If the identity of any person is discovered inadvertently, then the following should be done;
    1. no use will be made of this knowledge,
    2. the HINTS Program staff will be notified of the incident,
    3. no one else will be informed of the discovered identity.
  5. You will not release nor permit others to release the data in full or in part to any person except with the written approval of the HINTS Program staff.
  6. If accessing the data from a centralized location on a time sharing computer system or LAN, you will not share your logon name and password with any other individuals. You will also not allow any other individuals to use your computer account after you have logged on with your logon name and password.
  7. For all software provided by the HINTS Program, you will not copy, distribute, reverse engineer, profit from its sale or use, or incorporate it in any other software system.
  8. The source of information should be cited in all publications. The appropriate citation is associated with the data file used. Please see Suggested Citations in the Download HINTS Data section of this Web site, or the Readme.txt associated with the ASCII text version of the HINTS data.
  9. Analyses of large HINTS domains usually produce reliable estimates, but analyses of small domains may yield unreliable estimates, as indicated by their large variances. The analyst should pay particular attention to the standard error and coefficient of variation (relative standard error) for estimates of means, proportions, and totals, and the analyst should report these when writing up results. It is important that the analyst realizes that small sample sizes for particular analyses will tend to result in unstable estimates.
  10. You may receive periodic e-mail updates from the HINTS administrators.